Nineteen Minutes – Jodi Picoult

Book Review – Nineteen Minutes by Jodi Picoult

3/5

Why do teens hate so much? Why is there a need to be a part of the popular crowd? Why do kids get bullied? Just because they are different from you? Why is there a need to bully and humiliate someone? Why so much hate and discrimination? These were the questions I was gripped with, while reading Nineteen Minutes by Jodi Picoult.

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Peter, a 17-year-old boy, has been bullied, shamed, humiliated publicly his entire school life. On the first day of Kindergarten, his new Superman lunch box was thrown out of the bus. One day, he enters the school, armed, and shoots everyone in his way.

The book deals with the repercussions a bullying incident can have on a person. The book deals with how the kids are obsessed with being included in the popular crowd. The ones who aren’t a part of their clique? They are to be laughed at, to be made fun of. What do you do when complains of such incidents to the school officials only makes it worse? What do you do when you’re the one constantly being detained for self-defence? The book deals with abusive teenage relationships. The book deals with the dynamics of a parent/kid relationship. If your kid complains to you about being bullied, what do you do? Do you threaten him to toughen up or do you stand up with him against the bully? What do you do if suddenly your kid has stopped opening up to you? If your child is a murderer, how do you forgive him? Yes, the book deals with many issues.

Above all, what do you do if you’re being bullied every single day of your life?

Though many questions raised and answered, I found the book a bit slow. There was no action, like in her usual works. Nothing was happening, no decisions were being made. Last 100 pages were splendidly gripping, that’s when the courtroom action began. It is surely worth a read.

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Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte

A book review of Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

3/5 stars

Working on my resolutions, I recently finished reading Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte. Truthfully, I had started the book a year ago. Then, the reader’s block kicked in. I picked it up again with the sole aim to complete it, and I did!

The book is about the life of an orphan, Jane Eyre. At a very young age, she is forced to live with cruelty in her Aunt Reed’s household. Soon, she is sent off to Lowood Charity School for her education, and she has trouble adjusting to the lifestyle of the school. Despite all these hardships, Jane graduates and gets recruited as a teacher in the same school. When a better offer comes along with the post of a Governess, she leaves for Thornfield where she meets Mr. Rochester. And the tale of love and dark secrets begins…

The main characters in this book are lovely. You admire and fall in love with Jane’s spirit. You can’t help but fall in love with the way Mr. Rochester loved Jane. And despite all the shortcomings, you would like to forgive them all. The love is strong with this one.

Jane Eyre is a ride. I remember, when I first started this book, I was hooked. I couldn’t stop reading it. The struggles of Jane, the unhappiness in her life, it was very well expressed. I was finding the narration quite engaging and impressive. I gobbled up the first half in two weeks. And then returned the reading slump. I couldn’t read it, I couldn’t read any book. So now, a year later, I picked it up and decided to give it another chance. Did I like the second half of the book? No. I found it very difficult to read. My interest kept dwindling off after every few paragraphs. The story wasn’t enticing anymore. The narration seemed boring, the writing quite difficult. And who mentions that the book has a happy ending in the blurb cover? Hello, every heard of spoiler alert? Overall, I came to the conclusion that this was an okay read. I am quite glad I completed this book, though. It was loving, a bit heartbreaking but an okay read. The one thing I can certainly say I like in classics is their dialogue exchanges. Oh, they can make anyone go weak in the knees!

 

Lyrebird – Cecelia Ahern

Lyrebird – Cecelia Ahern

Lyrebird by Cecelia Ahern

Review – 1/5 stars

When you eagerly wait for a book and it turns out to be disappointing. You should know, I am a huge fan of Cecelia Ahern’s books. When I received my copy, I was smitten with the beautiful cover and very excited to start the Lyrebird journey.

whatsapp-image-2017-01-21-at-12-41-49-pmThe book is about the life of Laura who is living isolated among the mountains in a small cottage of the town. She mimics. From the coffee machine to the melody of birds, she can mimic each and every sound perfectly. When a documentary team of Bo, Solomon, and Rachel discover her talents, she becomes the subject of their documentary film. The story enlarges as Laura’s secrets are revealed and how the public reacts to her talents.

Personally, I refuse to believe that Cecelia Ahern has written this book. I haven’t liked plenty of her book storylines, but her writing has always been beautiful. This book isn’t.   It’s cringeworthy, irritating and by far her worst. I am hugely disappointed. All of the characters were annoying. Especially, horny Solomon. I am used to falling in love with the male leads of Cecelia’s books. Bo’s character which I am sure was invented to gather hate, was the only one I liked. I couldn’t even read a dialogue without wanting to close the book. I wouldn’t recommend this book. May she write better novels in the coming years.